Intestinal parasitic infections among the household staff working in Saudi family houses Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Authors

  • Haytham Ahmed Zakai Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80324, Jeddah-21589, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
  • Anas Ali Abunar Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80324, Jeddah-21589, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
  • Almohanned Ayman Khoudari Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80324, Jeddah-21589, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Keywords:

Intestinal parasites, Household staff, Jeddah

Abstract

This study aimed to detect and examine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection among the household staff of Saudi families in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. One hundred stool samples were collected from the household staff 34 female and 66 male. Stool samples were examined using the direct wet smear and the formalin-ethyl acetate sedimentation technique. Stages of intestinal parasites were found in 15 samples (5 from male 10 from female participants). The most prevalent species found was Blastocystis hominis and Entamoeba histolytica. The highest rate of infection was seen in expatriates from Bangladesh. The present study reflects the importance of pre-employment medical check-up and regular investigation.

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References

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Published

01-04-2014

How to Cite

Zakai, H. A., Abunar, A. A., & Khoudari, A. A. (2014). Intestinal parasitic infections among the household staff working in Saudi family houses Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Journal of Advanced Laboratory Research in Biology, 5(2), 18–20. Retrieved from https://e-journal.sospublication.co.in/index.php/jalrb/article/view/180

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