An assessment of water quality of river Yamuna at Waterworks station, Agra

  • Navneet Kumar Department of Environmental Toxicology, School of Life Science, Dr. B.R. Ambedkar University, Agra-282002, India.
  • H. N. Sharma Department of Environmental Toxicology, School of Life Science, Dr. B.R. Ambedkar University, Agra-282002, India.
  • Yogesh Gupta Department of Environmental Toxicology, School of Life Science, Dr. B.R. Ambedkar University, Agra-282002, India.
Keywords: Water pollution, Physiochemical parameters, Ghats, Water treatment, Sewage

Abstract

The present study is an effort to know the water quality of river Yamuna. The water of river Yamuna is collected and treated before supplying to the city. As the Yamuna river comes to Agra passing through several cities, some of them are industrial which dump their waste into the river. Besides this city waste or sewage is also dumped. As the river Yamuna passes through Ghats due to which various organic, as well as inorganic waste, are also added to the Yamuna river which increases the pollution load. “During our study at Waterworks, Agra, It was observed that the pH, Hardness, Chloride, and Alkalinity are always higher than the IS Standards. In river Yamuna’s water due to dumping problem many problems arise which increases the colour, pH as well as other physiochemical parameters. Due to which the colour becomes higher than the normal standard as by IS standards (Which is maximum 20 Hazon)”. Due to such an increased pollution in Yamuna river water, the water treatment at Waterworks, Agra become difficult and the chlorine dosing (Which is used for disinfection) and Alum dosing (For sedimentation) becomes higher and dosing quantity changes according to the seasonal variation in Yamuna river water.

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Published
2015-04-01
How to Cite
Kumar, N., Sharma, H., & Gupta, Y. (2015). An assessment of water quality of river Yamuna at Waterworks station, Agra. Journal of Advanced Laboratory Research in Biology, 6(2), 62-67. Retrieved from https://e-journal.sospublication.co.in/index.php/jalrb/article/view/227
Section
Articles