Identification and determination of antibiotic resistance of pathogenic bacteria Isolated from Septic Wounds

  • Alsadig Mohammed Abdalla Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Sebha University, P.O. Box 18758, Sebha-Libya.
  • Abdelkader Alsanousi G. Elzen Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Sebha University, P.O. Box 18758, Sebha-Libya.
  • Ahmed Alshahed Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Sebha University, P.O. Box 18758, Sebha-Libya.
  • Gurfa Abu Azoom Sh. Az. Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Sebha University, P.O. Box 18758, Sebha-Libya.
  • Aziza Heeba M.O. Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Sebha University, P.O. Box 18758, Sebha-Libya.
  • Gaeidaa A. Mohammed M.A. Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Sebha University, P.O. Box 18758, Sebha-Libya.
  • Habsa Yunis Ab. K. Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Sebha University, P.O. Box 18758, Sebha-Libya.
  • Nisreen Mohammed Ab Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Sebha University, P.O. Box 18758, Sebha-Libya.
Keywords: Septic wounds, Pathogenic Bacteria, Identification and Determination of Antibiotic Resistance

Abstract

Wound infection is a global cause of morbidity and mortality across all wound types. Therefore, efficient diagnosis and treatment of wound infection are essential. This study was carried out to identify the pathogenic bacteria in infected wounds of the patient’s attending Sebha city hospitals (Libya) and to determine their resistance profile to the most common antibiotics used in therapy. A total of sixty wound swab specimens were collected and cultured, of which 39 samples showed bacterial growth. Three different species of bacteria were isolated. Staphylococcus aureus 21 (53.9%) were the most common organisms followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa 10 (25.6%) and Staphylococcus epidermidis 8 (20.5%). The antibiotic susceptibility test of the bacterial isolate was performed by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Results showed that 90.5% of the Staphylococcus aureus isolates were resistant to vancomycin, 61.9% to tetracycline, 57.1% to amoxicillin, 52.4 % to methicillin, 42.9 to erythromycin and 23.8% to streptomycin. 87.5% of the Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates were resistant to vancomycin, 75% to methicillin, 62.5% to tetracycline, 50% to streptomycin 37.5% to amoxicillin, and erythromycin. All the Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were sensitive to ciprofloxacin and highly resistant 90-100% to other antibiotics tested Amoxicillin, Nalidixic acid, Streptomycin, and Tetracycline. The high rate of multiple antibiotic resistance was observed in all bacterial species recovered.

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References

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Published
2015-10-01
How to Cite
Abdalla, A., Elzen, A., Alshahed, A., Az., G., M.O., A., M.A., G., K., H., & Ab, N. (2015). Identification and determination of antibiotic resistance of pathogenic bacteria Isolated from Septic Wounds. Journal of Advanced Laboratory Research in Biology, 6(4), 97-101. Retrieved from https://e-journal.sospublication.co.in/index.php/jalrb/article/view/234
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Articles