Histopathological Study of Subacute Toxic Effects of Chloroacetic Acid on Albino Rats and its Correlation with Serum Levels of Malondialdehyde

  • Kafil Akhtar Department of Pathology, J.N. Medical College, A.M.U., Aligarh-202001, India.
  • Md. Shadab Raheel Department of Forensic Medicine, J.N. Medical College, A.M.U., Aligarh-202001, India.
  • Shamim J. Rizvi Department of Forensic Medicine, J.N. Medical College, A.M.U., Aligarh-202001, India.
  • Rana K. Sherwani Department of Pathology, J.N. Medical College, A.M.U., Aligarh-202001, India.
  • M. Faisal Ali Siddiqui Interdisciplinary Brain Research Centre, J.N. Medical College, A.M.U., Aligarh-202001, India.
Keywords: Chloroacetic acid, Histopathology, Rattus norvegicus, MDA

Abstract

Human beings are increasingly being exposed to chloroacetic acid (CAA), a type of halo acetic acid. It would not be an exaggeration to say that almost the whole humankind today is affected by it or its metabolites. The concern over the carcinogenicity of haloacetic acids led the United States Environmental Protection Agency to regulate the allowable concentration of haloacetic acids in drinking water as part of the Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule promulgated in 1998. Keeping this view in mind, the present study on histolopathological evaluation of different types of tissues viz., brain, kidney, liver, spleen and testes of Rattus norvegicus was performed, to find out the subacute toxicity of chloroacetic acid and correlation between CAA administration and changes in malondialdehyde (MDA) level in blood.

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References

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Published
2012-04-01
How to Cite
Akhtar, K., Raheel, M., Rizvi, S., Sherwani, R., & Siddiqui, M. (2012). Histopathological Study of Subacute Toxic Effects of Chloroacetic Acid on Albino Rats and its Correlation with Serum Levels of Malondialdehyde. Journal of Advanced Laboratory Research in Biology, 3(2), 50-53. Retrieved from https://e-journal.sospublication.co.in/index.php/jalrb/article/view/97
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Articles